Movie Review Archive K-P

Movie Reviews For People Who've Lived A Little

lReviews A-E    Reviews F-J    Reviews Q-Z

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Keep the Change (2018) ****
Writer/director Rachel Israel's first feature checks off all the boxes for a classic romantic comedy — but her story about two New York people with autism finding love touches on heartstrings you didn't know you had. (FULL REVIEW)


The King of Jazz (1930) ****
The movies had only been talking for two years, and Technicolor was in its infancy, but Universal combined both elements for this lavish musical, the likes of which audiences had never seen. It's just a glorified vaudeville show, but what a show it is: Paul Whiteman conducts "Rhapsody in Blue" and a big-eared youngster named Bing Crosby croons like a rosy-cheeked schoolboy. 


Kong: Skull Island (2017) ***
Everybody's favorite big ape is back and ape-ier than ever in the umpteenth reboot of the classic monster franchise. As you'd expect, computer imagery has advanced to the point where it can detail every hair on Kong's body, which this time is preposterously huge, even bigger than Dino De Laurentis' 1976 version. But because this edition focuses only on the first half of the original story — an overblown elaboration on the discovery of Kong on his cloud-shrouded South Pacific island — we never get to the part that even DeLaurentis knew was the ultimate payoff: "When the monkey die, people gonna cry." 


The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) **  The performances by stars Colin Farrell and Nicole Kidman are first-rate, but unfortunately they're in the service of an off-the-wall story by director Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster) that involves a troubled young man (Barry Keoghan) forcing a heart surgeon (Farrell) to choose which member of his own family to kill. The roles are played with the same bloodless detachment Farrell evoked in Lanthimos' Lobster, leaving us with little empathy for the main characters and lots of misgivings about the film's narrative, which is best described as Sophie's Choice played for laughs. (FULL REVIEW)



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La La Land (2016) ****
Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone channel Fred and Ginger (FULL REVIEW)


Lady Bird (2017) *****

Writer/director Greta Gerwig's flawless study of a teenager (Saoirse Ronan) and her mother (Laurie Metcalf) strikes one true note after another. For a parent, it's like Gerwig has been hiding in your hall closet for 10 years. 


Lady MacBeth (2017) ****
At first you're totally in the corner of young Katherine (Florence Pugh), a Victorian-girl given in a loveless marriage. Even when her plucky sense of rebellion eventually turns murderous, you want to give her the benefit of the doubt. By the time she's sunken to the level of unspeakable violence, it's too late: you're an accomplice. Director WIlliam Oldroyd masterfully guides us down the film's slippery slope


The Last Word (2017)  ***  
Shirley MacLaine saves the day as a retired businesswoman who hires a newspaper reporter (Amanda Seyfried) to write her obituary (FULL REVIEW)


Lee Daniels’ The Butler (2013) ***
The title might have worked better as Forest Whitaker Is the Butler, or maybe Oprah Winfrey Is the Wife of the Butler. No matter; audiences flocked to see Whitaker as White House butler Cecil Gaines, Robin Williams as President Eisenhower, and Jane Fonda as Nancy Reagan.  


The Leisure Seeker (2018) ***

There are modest pleasures aplenty in this road trip flick, following a long-married couple (Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland) as they take one last drive to Florida in their beloved but dilapidated motor home. He's slipping into dementia, she's in the grip of serious illness. Still, the film is not about the ravages of age, but the ultimate and inevitable triumph of marital devotion. (FULL REVIEW)


Literally, Right Before Aaron (2017) ***
In the latest coming-of-age film to take its marching orders from The Graduate, Adam (Justin Long) is another unfocused young man who turns up at the wedding of his ex-galpal (Cobie Smulders) and proceeds to sabotage it. Walking a comedic tightrope, writer/director Ryan Eggold (he’s the guy who plays Tom Keen on TV’s The Blacklist) pulls off a neat trick: Even though Adam is a hopeless narcissist, we grow reluctantly fond of him because as difficult as it is to endure him, we can see it’s a lot harder to be him.  


The Letters (2015) ***

Juliet Stevenson's performance as a young Mother Theresa is heavenly, but the hagiographic script is hellish (FULL REVIEW)


Logan (2017) ****
The most thoughtful superhero flick in memory. Marvel mutant Wolverine (Hugh Jackman), facing old age and extinction of the X-Men, finds a young girl who might have special powers of her own. 


 Logan Lucky (2017) ****
Director Steven Soderberg may have a new Ocean's 11 franchise on his hands — albeit one that mixes the ingredients of a classic heist flick with a Cohen Brothers movie. For this breezy heist movie set at a NASCAR race track, he's assembled a dream cast including Channing Tatum, Adam Driver, Riley Keough, Katie Holmes and, best of all, 007 star Daniel Craig as a good-old-boy safecracker named Joe Bang. (FULL REVIEW)


The Lost City of Z (2017) ****

Writer/director James Gray drinks lustily from the cup of master epic-maker David Lean in his sweeping true story of Percy Fawcett, the British explorer who made multiple trips to the Amazon in the early 1900s seeking what he called The Lost City of Z. Charlie Hunnan brings a Peter O'Toole-like obsession to the role, but his long-suffering wife, played by Sienna Miller, remains a cipher. Which goes to show, from a man's perspective, that compared to the complexities of women it is easier to explain why a guy would spend three years at a time fighting off piranha and picking leaches from his legs   (FULL REVIEW) 


Love and Friendship *** (2016)
Chloe Sevigny and Kate Beckinsale star in this fast-paced version of a Jane Austen novella (FULL REVIEW)


Love the Coopers ** (2015)
Diane Keaton and John Goodman unwrap a very unmerry Christmas gift (FULL REVIEW)


Loveless (2017) ****
On its surface, Loveless follows a bitterly feuding soon-to-be-divorced couple, Zhenya and Boris (Maryana Spivak and Aleksey Rozin) who are so consumed by hatred for each other (and burning lust for their lovers) that they fail to notice that their young son Alyosha (Matvey Novikov) has been missing for an entire day. But the pair’s circular pursuit of the immediate at the expense of what really matters is for Zvyaginstev a microcosm of the relentless cycles of self-destruction that consume not only people, but also nations.(FULL REVIEW)


The Lovers (2017) ****
Debra Winger and Tracy Letts spring one deilghtful surprise after another as a long-married couple headed for divorce...until they fall in lust with each other. (FULL REVIEW)


Loving (2016) ****

Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga star in the human story of a landmark court case  (FULL REVIEW)


Loving Vincent (2017) *****  
One of the most extraordinary animated films ever made utilizes 65,000 oil paintings to illuminate the last days of Vincent Van Gogh. Directors Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman reference numerous famous Van Gogh images, but every frame is infused with the spark and danger of the painter's genius. It takes about five minutes to get used to this singular experience; after that you are utterly along for the ride. 



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The Magnificent Seven (2016) **

Chris Pratte, Ethan Hawke and Denzel Washington do a walk-through remake of the classic western (FULL REVIEW)


Man of Steel (2013) ***

Well-made, but the fight scenes last longer than the half-life of Kryptonite (FULL REVIEW)


Manchester By the Sea (2016) *****
Casey Affleck is brilliant as a troubled man forced to take custody of his feisty nephew (FULL REVIEW)

  

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (2013) ****
In any other year, Idris Elba’s towering performance as Nelson Mandela would land him on anyone’s Best Actor Oscar shortlist. Alas, the dance card is probably already full this time around, but that’s no reason to miss Elba tracing the life of the South African legend from young adulthood through his 27-year imprisonment. Naomie Harris is at times chillingly intense as his wife Winnie, and director Justin Chadwick (The First Grader) continues his love affair with inspiring, true African stories.


Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House  (2017) ***
Liam Neeson stars as the lifetime FBI bureaucrat who became "Deep Throat," the unnamed source who helped The Washington Post nail Richard Nixon in the Watergate scandal. The movie over-explains and feels unnecessarily dark, but Neeson creates a compelling character who must decide if betrayal can ever equal loyalty.  (FULL REVIEW)


Marshall (2017) ****

Chadwick Boseman captures the quiet dignity and subtle legal genius of Thurgood Marshall, playing the future Supreme Court justice as a young lawyer, defending a Black man in a racist 1940s courtroom, and once more manages to find the soul of a complex character. Josh Gadd is a delight as Marshall's very Jewish colleague. As the tale unfolds in ultra-conservative Connecticut, the two stars give this conventional courtroom drama an unexpected buddy picture vibe


Matinee ***** (1993)  

Joe Dante's warm-hearted comedy about a boy (Simon Fenton) living in Key West at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis is at once a disarming time capsule and a love letter to the B-movie horror flicks that flourished in the early nuclear age. John Goodman plays a schlock producer/director who's premiering his latest atrocity in Key West — and who sees the nation's nuke mania as the ultimate marketing tool. Chuckling in the face of Armageddon, Goodman's character embraces horror in a great big bear hug, while helping the boy face the equally daunting terrors of the teen years. .


Maudie (2017) ****
Sally Hawkins and Ethan Hawke steal your heart as severely arthritic, barely educated Canadian painter Maud Adams and her fishmonger husband (FULL REVIEW)


Maze Runner: The Death Cure (2018)  *

The final installment in this teen sci-fi trilogy gave me one reason to rejoice: I never saw the first two. Set in a dystopian future (is there any other kind?), the story of a ragtag group of kids raining hell on a city occupied by corrupt overlords is pretty much a series of set pieces inspired by other, better movies. Here's hoping Patricia Clarkson got paid handsomely for taking a job that, for a lesser talent, could well have been a career killer. 


Me Before You (2015) *** 

Everyone suffers beautifully in this classy weepie (FULL REVIEW)


The Meddler (2016) ****
Susan Sarandon and J.K. Simmons make  a cozy couple in this tale of a mom (Sarandon) still clinging to her grown daugher (Rose Byrne) (FULL REVIEW)


Megan Leavey (2017) ****  
You won't have to be a dog lover to be reduced to tears by the true tale of a U.S. Marine (Kate Mara) and her devotion to the bomb-sniffing dog who saved her life in Afghanistan. (FULL REVIEW)


Menashe **** (2017)  
The heartbreaking story of an orthodox Jewish father (Menashe Lustig) in Brooklyn trying to balance his faith with his desire to raise his son is virtually all in Yiddish, yet you don't even need the subtitles to be utterly absorbed. Director Joshua Z. Weinstein's film provides an often perplexing look at a little-seen sliver of American society.

  

Metallica Through the Never (2013) ***
A rockapalooza with the quintessential ’80s Heavy Metal band, who will? Go for the music, stay for Kirk Hammett’s hair.


Miles Ahead (2016) ***

Don Cheadle and Ewan McGregor drink and drug their way through the story of MIles Davis. Cheadle gives the performance of a lifetime (FULL REVIEW)


More Art Upstairs**** (2018)
What if there were an American Idol for visual artists, like painters and sculptors? That’s the idea behind this delightful and inspiring documentary. Each year, the entire city of Grand Rapids, Michigan turns out to judge works by major artists, then votes on who will win a half-million-dollars in prizes —  the largest cash award in the art world. Director Jody Hassett Sanchez introduces us to a handful of the contestants, then keeps them — and us — on pins and needles until the winners are announced. 


Mr. Holmes (2015) ****
Ian McKellan mesmerizes as 93-year-old Sherlock Holmes, obsessed with his one unsolved case (FULL REVIEW)


Mr. Roosevelt (2017) ****
Noël Wells writes, directs, and stars in this breakthrough comedy about a struggling young LA comic (Wells) who returns to her native Austin, Texas, to deal with a family emergency...and comes face-to-face with the myriad was life has gone on without her. The premise is frothy, but the film is brimming with smart and sneakily soulful observations of how we are all, at one time or another, on the outside looking in. (FULL REVIEW)


Molly's Game (2017) *** 

Oscar-winning writer Aaron Sorkin (Moneyball, Steve Jobs) directs his own script for the first time, and surprisingly he does a better job than the other guys of pacing his machine gun dialogue. Still, his telling of the true story of Molly Bloom (Jessica Chastain), a former Olympic skier who ran one of America's most exclusive (and illegal) card games, is oddly soulless. Despite heartfelt scenes with her lawyer (Idris Elba) and dad (Kevin Costner), we never really learn enough about Molly to truly care about her. (FULL REVIEW)


Mom & Dad (2018) ****
Writer/director Brian Taylor is really onto something in this whip-smart horror fable, set on the day when, for reasons only hinted at, parents across the country become obsessed with a desire to murder their children. On one level, the plot gives Nicolas Cage license to unleash his full-frontal madman as he chases his two kids with a reciprocating electric saw, screaming, "Sawzall! It really saws all!" On the other, the film mines the deep veins of distrust and resentment that trace beneath the surface of even the most well-adjusted family. It's not quite as artful, but still a worthy second feature to the similarly subversive Get Out. 


A Monster Calls (2016) **** Sigourney Weaver costars as the grandmother of a troubled young boy in a dark fantasy/psychological thriller fueled by childhood fears (FULL REVIEW)


Monuments Men (2014) ***

George Clooney's buddy adventure about U.S. soldiers trying to recover stolen art is more fun than a barrel of Monets (FULL REVIEW)


More Art Upstairs (2018) ****
What if there were an American Idol for visual artists, like painters and sculptors? That’s the idea behind this delightful and inspiring documentary. Each year, the entire city of Grand Rapids, Michigan turns out to judge works by major artists, then votes on who will win a half-million-dollars in prizes —  the largest cash award in the art world. Director Jody Hassett Sanchez introduces us to a handful of the contestants, then keeps them — and us — on pins and needles until the winners are announced.


mother! **

Something is clearly wrong with the remote house occupied by Javier Bardem and Jennifer Lawrence: The walls bleed, as do the floors, and the place makes ungodly noises. But the real problem here is writer/director Darren Aronofsky's ambition to infuse his dark tale with Biblical allusions reaching from Genesis to Revelation, yet somehow forget to provide a meaningful context. (FULL REVIEW)


Mother's Day * (2016)
A truly awful attempt at sentimental comedy results in a film not even a mother could love (FULL REVIEW)


The Mountain Between Us (2017) ***
It's hard to go wrong watching Kate Winslet and Idris Elba for a couple of hours, but the gimmicky, cloying script about two people stranded in the mountains does its best to squander their talents. 


The Mummy (2017) ***
Tom Cruise gets wrapped up in an ancient Egyptian princess' plot to conquer the world via supernatural powers and zombies. He runs a lot.


Murder on the Orient Express (2017) ****
Drinking heartily from the font of Sidney Lumet's lush 1974 version, director/star Kenneth Branagh guides us through Agatha Christie's most famous mystery with a deft and knowing hand. Sporting a moustache that deserves its own billing, Branagh plays detective Hercule Poirot with delightful eccentricity while providing lots of star-type turns for his stellar cast of suspects, including Daisy Ridley, Leslie Odom Jr., Penelope Cruz, Derek Jacobi, Michelle Pfeiffer, Judi Dench and Willem Dafoe. It's no spoiler that Johnny Depp plays the victim, and to his credit he makes us good and glad he's dead. 


My Blue Heaven (1990) ***
The Blu-ray release of this offbeat buddy comedy about an effusive gangster (Steve Martin) and the federal agent assigned to protect him (Rick Moranis) won't make the top of anyone's list of achievements by the stars or writer Norah Ephron or director Herbert Ross. But it does serve to remind us how very much we miss Moranis, who hasn't made a movie in 20 years. 


My Cousin Rachel (2017) ***

Rachel Weisz is hypnotic as the mysterious woman who may or may not be responsible for the death of a 19th Century British nobleman. The deceased's brother (Sam Claflin) is determined to prove her guilt even as he falls hopelessly in love with her. Daphne Du Maurier's novel has already been a movie (with Olivia de Havilland and Richard Burton) and a TV miniseries (with Geraldine Chaplin); this time around director Roger Michell (Notting Hill) heaps on the incriminating evidence like a Mississippi prosecutor. When he finally raises a shadow of a doubt, right near the end, we feel like a jury that's been lied to. 


My Name is Emily (2017) ****
A young Irish girl (Evanna Lynch) talks a schoolmate (George Webster) into driving her across the country to see her eccentric dad in this remarkably insightful coming-of-age comedy from quadriplegic director Simon FItzmaurice (FULL REVIEW)



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Nebraska (2013) ****
In a career-defining performance, Bruce Dern is a slightly befuddled fellow who’s convinced he’s won $1 million in a sweepstakes. Will Forte is the good son who offers to drive him from Montana to Nebraska to claim the dubious prize. Amazing performances all around, directed by Alexander Payne (The Descendants, About Schmidt).  


Night of the Living Dead (1968) ****

Maybe it's because George Romero used borrowed equipment from a Pittsburgh news station and enlisted much of his cast off the street, but there's something uncannily visceral about his low-budget zombie masterpiece. Watch it once, and you'll never view a distant figure walking through a graveyard the same way. 


Norman (2017) ****

Richard Gere has found he role of a lifetime in the understated portrait of an enigmatic New York "fixer," a guy who spends his days making seemingly random personal connections with influential people in hopes of someday matching them up in arcane business deals. But the more time we spend with Norman, the more mysterious becomes. In the end, we know only what Norman wants us to  (FULL REVIEW) 


Novitiate  (2017) ****

The film's focus is on a 17-year-old girl (Margaret Qualley) who enters a super-strict convent just as Vatican II begins to loosen things up in the Catholic Church. But the movie's lightning rod is Melissa Leo as the Mother Superior, a terse dictator whose entire identity is wrapped up in tradition, and who is not about to kick the old habits. Alternately infuriated  and exhausted by her hopeless battle against Catholic authorities, Leo also conveys the heartbreak of one who believes her one true love, God Himself, has let her down. 


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Othello (1952-55) ****   
Strapped for cash and squeezing shoots between acting gigs, Orson Welles and his cast convened over the course of three years in Morocco, Venice, Tuscany, and Rome to create this supremely cinematic version of Shakespeare's tale of bigotry and greed. Make a double feature of this and Welles' Chimes at Midnight (1965) — a brilliant and similarly patched-together blend of five Shakespeare plays — and you'll understand why enthusiasts consider Welles the Bard's premier screen adaptor. 


  

Out of the Furnace (2013) ***
Christian Bale and Casey Affleck duke it out for acting Oscar nominations in this flint-edged story of two brothers raised in a Pennsylvania steel mill town. When a stab at backwoods boxing goes horribly wrong for one of them, the other stumbles to the rescue, encountering along the way a truly scary hillbilly, played with restrained sociopathic finesse by Woody Harrelson.


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Paint It Black (2017) ***
Janet McTeer is chilling as a mother who blames her son's suicide on his grieving girlfriend (Alia Shawkat) (FULL REVIEW)

  

The Painted Veil (2006) ***

Edward Norton and Naomi Watts star as a mismatched British couple fighting a cholera epidemic in China. With Sally Hawkins, Toby Jones and Liev Schreiber and lush cinematography by Stuart Dryburgh (The Piano, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty)


The Paper (1994) ****
Folded somewhere between The Post and The Front Page, Ron Howard's slam-bang story of a big-city editor (Michael Keaton) trying to do an end run around his paper's penny-pinching owner (Glenn Close) sparkles with  fun nostalgia for the golden era of "Hello Sweetheart, Get Me Rewrite!"  Two decades later, it's an aching reminder of a time when print journalism was the heartbeat of every town in America.


 Paranoia (2013) ***
A by-the-numbers plot ultimately foils this would-be thriller, but there’s still some fun to be had in watching Gary Oldman and Harrison Ford (in a skull-baring buzz cut!) go mano a mano as big business rivals. 


Paris Can Wait (2016) ***
Diane Lane is adorable as the wife of a much-too-busy movie producer (Alec Baldwin, sans orange hair for once!), who entrusts her to the care of a French pal (Arnaud Viard) for a one-day drive from Cannes to Paris. But this is France, so that quick hop turns into a multi-day romantic whirl as the two take in the country's most beautiful countryside and fantastic food. Directed by Eleanor Coppola, the 80-year-old wife of Francis Ford—making her first-ever feature film.

  

Parkland (2013) ***
This sometimes disjointed docudrama follows a slew of Dallas folks-famous and infamous-on the day JFK was shot. Marcia Gay Harden and Zac Efron play staff at Parkland Memorial Hospital, where the President was rushed; Paul Giamatti is Abraham Zapruder, creator of the most famous home movie of all time; Jacki Weaver plays the mother of assassin Lee Harvey Oswald.


The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) *****
Every film school nerd has marveled at the expressionist artistry of director Carl Dreyer and the transcendant performance of Renee Falconetti in this evocative account of St. Joan's final hours. Astonishingly modern yet hauntingly Medieval, this film created an entire volume of new cinematic language. Criterion Collection's new disc includes three musical scores and a new digital restoration. 


Patti Cake$ (2017) **** The latest missive from that cauldron of suburban angst, New Jersey: Danielle McDonald is a revelation as white rapper Patricia Dumbrowski, a.k.a. Killer P., a.k.a. Patti Cake$. She dreams of stardom mostly as a way to escape her humdrum hometown. The film echoes Saturday Night Fever and 8 Mile, but McDonald and writer/director Geremy Gasper (Hillsdale, NJ's favorite son) bring a fresh cadence. 


Paul, Apostle of Christ (2018) ****
First-rate performances propel this historical drama about the Apostle Paul (Game of Thrones' James Faulkner) and Gospel writer Luke (Passion of the Christ's Jim Caviezel). The two characters play off each other so effectively — discussing faith and fear within the confines of Paul's Rome prison cell — that we begin to resent the passages when co-writer/director Andrew Hyatt pulls us out into the light to show Paul's eventful life in flashback.(FULL REVIEW)  


Personal Shopper (2016) ***  
There are many eerie delights in Olivier Assayas' spooky story about a young woman (Kristen Stewart) haunted by the death of her twin brother. But nothing will prepare you for the truly harrowing scene in which Stewart's character finds herself texting with a possible ghost. Try not to jump each time the phone goes "bloop!"


Philomena (2013) ****
Judi Dench gives the performance of a lifetime as the title character, a woman seeking the son she gave up as a child. Steve Coogan, who also wrote the film’s moving and disarmingly funny script, costars as the investigative reporter who helps unravel the tangle of deceit and corruption that very nearly choked off the truth behind Philomena’s quest. Based on a true story. 


Pirates of Somalia (2017) ****
Consider it Captain Phillips: The Rest of the Story. Writer/director Bryan Buckley, Oscar nominated for a short film set in Somalia, returns to that embattled nation with this true tale of a struggling writer (Evan Peters), who decides to make his own big break by heading to Somalia as a freelancer. He pursues a story about local pirates who commandeer cargo ships for ransom and discovers a human element he'd never dreamed of. Peters is extraordinary as an innocent who finds himself thrust into a lawless land where long history and current desperation mix. And Barkhad Abdi, who was nominated for an Oscar as a Somalian pirate in Captain Phillips, brings authenticity to the role of the young man's guide through this little corner of Hell. 


The Post (2017) ****
Meryl Streep is Washington Post owner Katherine Graham, Tom Hanks is editor-in-chief Ben Bradlee, and Steven Spielberg is the director — and that's about all you need to know about this dynamite newspaper saga. We find Graham facing twin, intertwined crises: Her editor wants to take on the Nixon administration by excerpting the notorious Pentagon Papers right at the moment when she's trying to take the family-owned newspaper public. In the course of the ordeal, Streep's Graham transforms from an uncertain CEO bullied by her male board members into a full-voiced authoritarian who knows what she wants and isn't afraid to get some ink on her hands to make it happen. Meanwhile, Hanks' Bradlee is an ambitious but pragmatic newshound who's equally at home dealing with both exremes of his boss's personality spectrum. Best of all, Spielberg evokes the slam-bang spirit of old-time newspaper work, from the looming once-a-day deadlines to the pneumatic office tubes to the rumble of a giant press in the basement, signaling the end of one news cycle and the start of another.  (FULL REVIEW) 


 Prisoners (2013) ****
This gritty crime drama stars Hugh Jackman as a distraught Georgia dad who kidnaps the guy he believes abducted his 6-year-old daughter. It’s the old vigilante dad story, all right, but get a load of the rest of the cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Melissa Leo, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, and Paul Dano 


Puerto Ricans in Paris (2016) *** 

Luiz Guzman and Edgar Garcia don't quite translate as New York cops on the Seine (FULL REVIEW)


Pure Country, Pure Heart (2017) ***
This gentle, music-infused family drama follows two Tennessee teens (Amanda Detmer and Kaitlyn Bausch) as they try to learn family secrets about their dad, who died a hero in Afghanistan. The drama is heartfelt and  the music (by the girls and costars Ronny Cox and Willie Nelson) goes down easy



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